POWERLIFTING: Bowie features quality, Nocona has more numbers

By ERIC VICCARO
sports@bowienewsonline.com

The Bowie High School boys’ and girls’ powerlifting teams will stress quality over quantity this season.
Meanwhile, the Nocona boys’ powerlifting team has a record number of participants this season with 11.
That’s part and parcel over how the numbers game will play out for both the Rabbits and Indians this season, which begins on Jan. 7 when Bowie plays host to a meet. Here’s a rundown on both Bowie and Nocona.

Bowie
The Bowie girls’ team returns three state qualifiers in Kylie Robinson at 123 pounds, Carcyn Robertson (132) and Carrington Davis (165).
“On the girls’ side, we are looking to qualify everyone for regionals,” said Bowie strength and conditioning coach Monte Sewell. We’re going to have a solid team.”
The team features the addition of transfer student Tatum Posey at 181, plus returning Madison Metzler at 148 and Chloe Turlington (148/165) and Olivia Henry (148/165).
Bowie’s girls’ team will be strong up the middle, and the same could be said for the boys’ team – with a lack of both lightweights and heavyweights.

Nocona

Deziray Graham from Nocona will be helped by the addition of a new weight class for girls this year.
The heavyweight classes were split as follows for 2017: There will be a class from 220-259 pounds, and then the 259-plus pound category.
“Deziray wants to get back to state,” Nocona second-year head coach Jonathan Shaw said. “I don’t think it should be too difficult. If they had done the split last year, Deziray would have finished second in her class.”
Graham will be joined on the girls’ squad by newcomer Diamond Flores (105), Jessica Vogel (148), Lexi Towery (165), Taylor Richards (165) and Raelynn Lemons (165). Read more, and see complete season schedules, in the Jan. 4 Bowie News.

Nocona’s Deziray Graham prepares for a bench press during the 2016 Bowie Invitational. Graham was a state qualifier for the Lady Indians last year, and could be in medal contention this year thanks to the Texas High School Women’s Powerlifting Association splitting the top two heaviest weight classes. (News file photo by Eric Viccaro)